ASSIGNMENT B – Critique of research Article

This subject develops students’ research literacies through the exploration of a selection of research texts drawn from different traditions of enquiry. Students’ critical skills are developed through reading and discussing original research texts, as well as industry and media reports. Proficiency in critical reading and writing is developed through a critique of a research article as Assessment Task 1.

A) Concise, 1-2 page critique of research article in your own words (not the abstract recopied)

This subject develops students’ research literacies through the exploration of a selection of research texts drawn from different traditions of enquiry. Students’ critical skills are developed through reading and discussing original research texts, as well as industry and media reports. Proficiency in critical reading and writing is developed through a critique of a research article as Assessment Task 1.Debates within educational research are examined and differences highlighted between research perspectives (such as positivism, interpretivism, critical theory, feminism, and postmodern/poststructuralism). Participants learn to read research texts in terms of the ways in which they are constructed by assumptions about knowledge, values and the nature of reality, and by the practices and activities of the research process itself. Political and ethical issues raised by research involving human participants are explored. Class activities expose students to diverse methods of gathering and interpreting data, and allow key terms to be elaborated (including epistemology, ontology, methodology, research paradigm, and knowledge claims).

Critique a Research Article - American Nurses Association

Scholarly Article Evaluation Form. 144. Critique of Research Article Graduation Criteria. 145. Student Release Form. 146. Revised Extension Policy & Timelines. Teaching and learning strategies Mode of Delivery Weekly: 2 hrs face-to-face teaching x 13 weeks Distance: self-paced activities divided into 13 weekly modules Block: 3 face-to-face sessions of 7 hours each. This subject develops students’ research literacies through the exploration of a selection of research texts drawn from different traditions of enquiry. Students’ critical skills are developed through reading and discussing original research texts, as well as industry and media reports. Proficiency in critical reading and writing is developed through a critique of a research article as Assessment Task 1.Debates within educational research are examined and differences highlighted between research perspectives (such as positivism, interpretivism, critical theory, feminism, and postmodern/poststructuralism). Participants learn to read research texts in terms of the ways in which they are constructed by assumptions about knowledge, values and the nature of reality, and by the practices and activities of the research process itself. Political and ethical issues raised by research involving human participants are explored. Class activities expose students to diverse methods of gathering and interpreting data, and allow key terms to be elaborated (including epistemology, ontology, methodology, research paradigm, and knowledge claims).Through developing their appreciation of possible approaches to producing new knowledge in the educational field, students begin to identify and articulate researchable problems which arise in their own professional context, and to evaluate alternative approaches to them (Assignment 2). As research-literate educational professionals, they learn how to locate and synthesise relevant research around topics of interest, and to use research to provide support for initiatives in teaching and educational practices, organisational development and policy.

How to critique a journal article - UIS

Any critique is a type of paper, where you need to look critically at what the author is claiming, evaluate the research methods, and look for possible problems with, or applications of, the researcher's claims. Thus, in an introduction to your critique of a research article you will have to overview of the author's main point and how he or she supports it. The next step is interpreting the information from the article. Think about the following:

Scholarly Article Critique Student Example